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Archive for August, 2016

DSCN2143 The Bass River is great spot to explore. Our first paddle on the Bass River was in July 2005 we put in on the West Dennis side right off of Route 28,  there is a good parking area and landing so it was easy in and out and there is plenty of open space and shore line to explore. We went in one of our larger expeditions as we vacationed with my Brother-in-law and his family that year.  There were seven of us in all. Don, Renee and Matt were there for fishing, this was one of Don favorite fishing spot. Stripers were his goal! DSCN2142Of course he wanted one big enough to bring home for supper but that has eluded him the few times he fished here. The few small stripers he caught kept him motivated!  I was never a fisherman; mostly it was about having to take the fish off the hook. Not my cup of tea. What happens if I caught a river monster!!!

I had the whole family on this trip. We never ventured to far up river as there was enough to see and experience within a half mile from the launch. There was a nice Osprey family nesting close to the water and a big gaggle of geese wading near by. Don, Renee, and Matt fished most of the time while Diane, Danielle, Andrea, Megan, and me explored. DSCN2156This was only Diane’s second kayak excursion. She said she prefer smaller rivers, but this was nice. It’s now 2016 and I’m sad to say she has not been back out with me.  I am thankful she gives me the time to continue my kayaking passion.

I have it in my notes that I did go back to this same launch and went south a few years later.  My memory is it was a tough paddle because of the wind and tide so we did not get far.   I’ve learned since that it is very important to be aware of the conditions when paddling tidal rivers.

The we all had a great time here and I will return. I’d like to go up to Kelly’s Bay someday.  I have paddled Follins Pond further up but launched right in the pond. Be sure to read that blog, I had an outstanding experience kayaking in a heavy rain!

 

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IMG_2174This year my brother Don and I found another new paddling site, Elwell Island.  In years past, before my kayaking days, I had been to the “Northampton Rail Trail” many times and for me the best part of the trip had been the crossing of the Connecticut River on the Norwottuck Rail Trail Bridge.  I guess I was always drawn to water.  I’d seen the island from above and it would always bring me back to Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn and the rafting he did with Jim on Mississippi while escaping the bonds of slavery.  The Connecticut River was always what I had pictured the Mississippi to look like.  I did see the Mississippi when I visited New Orleans and it did not break the connection in my mind.

IMG_2178In my 15 years of kayaking I don’t ever remember looking at a map and noticing the put-in at the park. This was again a find on paddling.net’s application “Launch Sites”.  Turned out to be a great launch.  The Park’s entrance is on  Damon Road, as you enter take a quick right and follow the road down around the Quonset hut. There is plenty of parking and a port-a-potty in season.  The launch is a short carry down a steep but manageable road. On my second trip there, I backed my car down the hill without incident.  The dock is large and we were able to put in from either side. Once in the water we paddled across West Branch to Elwell Island and sat for our morning coffee and breakfast. Sorry but you’ll see this ritual in most of my blogs. It’s a wonderful tradition that we’ll keep because it so enjoyable to breakfast surrounded by the ever changing beauty of nature.

Going up the West Branch we found it to be very peaceful.  An occasional biker or runner could be seen crossing the bridge, but once past all was quiet.  On the way up we did see a Great Blue but not much else.  It was just peaceful.  IMG_7478Approaching the northern tip of the Island we saw a few boats anchored and a small party of boaters enjoying a liquid breakfast; looked like they were there for the day and they were supplied with several coolers to keep them going.  They were a friendly bunch and when prompted by Don we got an invite for a beer.  To close to breakfast for us, we kept paddling up through the sallow water and around the sandy beach.  Once out in the main body of the river one really got the feel for the size of the Connecticut River.  In spring the volume of water that flows from the ice melt is both incredible and dangerous.  About halfway down the island on our second trip we decided to put in and explore it.  I was upriver from Don and went into the heavily forested island alone.  I found a great campsite that with the right provisions would have made me, or Huckleberry and Jim, very comfortable for a few days.  But alas,,, there was a Sunday afternoon party to be back for.

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As for wildlife, between the two trips I saw a Peregrine Falcon, an Osprey, a Great Blue Heron, several Mallards, and an Otter.   The Peregrine Falcon was pretty exciting for me as it was the first I had observed.  They had been extinct in this area and they have now been successfully reintroduced.  Our famous nesting pair was on the Monarch building  and then on the Memorial Bridge in Springfield.  I wonder if this one was nesting on the Calvin Coolidge Bridge?   Seemed to be his territory.

I’ll be back here again as I want a better picture of this falcon!

 

 

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Quabog 003The Quaboag Pond and River was an exceptionally nice paddle. As I’m always partial to rivers and streams both times here we paddled to the river.

In June of 2002 I did this paddle with my brother Ray his son Anton and my daughter Megan.  Gee that was 14 years ago! It was a great outing for us and the kids as much then as my paddle this year with my brother Don.  The most memorable part of our first trip was watching a seaplane do about 20 landings and takeoffs on the lake.  We figured he was a beginner so we stayed out of his way of course!  I can remember my expert brother Ray pointing out all the plants and animals we saw.  Who would ever have known what a bladder-wort looks like and why they exist if not for him?  Ray pointed out the little flowers as if something sacred.  After years of kayaking rivers and ponds I now know why.  Life on this little planet of ours is so precarious!  Seeing how evasive plants spread and change the balance  is sometimes frightening!  To think that someday a beautiful pond will no longer be navigable for the weeds is very sad.  Too many ponds are already like that in late summer.

IMG_6079Looking back at the pictures this first trip was quite the same route we took in 2015.  On that second paddle in August of 2015 with my brother Don we launched from Quaboag St / Shore Road near the mouth of the East Brookfield River.  There is a pubic boat launch right there as well if you’d like to put-in on the ramp.  On this day, we decided to shoot for the Quaboag River instead of exploring the East Brookfield as it looked a bit overgrown. It does look to be a great paddle as it meanders north to Lake Lashaway.  I might try it earlier in the season next time.

IMG_6062aThe Quaboag River turned out to be wise choice!  The paddle was nice watching swallows flying to and fro above the water at mach speeds picking off their morning breakfast.  The real treat however was the river.  Compared to the last time I was here the river was a masterpiece of vibrant color as the magenta flowers from the plants lining the sides of the meandering river were in full bloom.  Beautiful!  Not sure of the name of these plants (Ray what are they???) but I just parked my kayak into a patch of them and took in the color.  I watch the bees pollinating the flowers one after another. Another wonder of nature we have to be careful not to loose.

IMG_6098When we were putting in there was another couple  doing the same.  They were heading south to Quacumquasit Pond for the fishing.  We found quite a few lone fishermen in the Quaboag River too.  Clearly there are fish to be had here if that’s what you’re after.   On our way out we drove down to Lake Road to take a look at the Quacumquasit and found it had a great ramp to get into the pond which was right next to the inlet to the Quaboag Pond.

I’ll close with “I’ll be back!”   Looks like three really great paddles here, one down two to go!

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IMG_2239For years we’ve summered in Dennis Port and kayaked without fail on the West Reservoir. Always looking for a new spot we’ve frequently passed the Swan Pond on the left hand side of Depot Road. As there never seemed to be a put in marked on any of my maps we continued to pass it by.  This year however, I found the town landing pinned on the “Launch Sites” application I just downloaded so I decided to give it a try one morning with my oldest daughter Danielle.  The launch was very nice with plenty of parking and a nice sandy put in. There were no signs on Depot Rd. but the put-in on Clipper Lane is not too hard time find by taking Stafford Circle or Otis Kelly Road.

IMG_7738The morning we launched it was cloudy but calm.  From Depot Rd and from looking at the maps it always looked like a private lake with a shoreline of beach houses. While natural shorelines are always preferable to me it’s nice to see how the other half live, the other half that have water views that is. Needless to say I’d be happy if I owned any of them on this pond. Of course my preference would be one with a per-existing dock, however, I did like the creativity of the house that had its own little lighthouse!  I was somewhat surprised that there was some substantial undeveloped shoreline to enjoy and a small island that we did not take the time to explore.  The natural shoreline was mostly on the south west quadrant that leads into the Swan Pond River. Most vacationers know this river as the place to rent Kayaks while in Dennis Port. Swan Pond River often resembles a great kayak autobahn. I’ve never had the inkling to try putting in here while there are so many other great un-populated waterways nearby.

 

IMG_7718As with any water on the Cape we saw Ospreys, Kingfishers, Swans, Mallards, Cormorants and Gulls. A few provided some pretty good photo opportunities. After a dozen years of kayaking I know it’s all about being at the right place at the right time to get that picture that you want to hang on the wall. This year that Osprey picture happened on the nearby West Reservoir.  I’ll post that picture on that blog.

 

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