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Archive for the ‘Manhan River.’ Category

I wrote the blog below in 2011 and since have been back several times.  This day, a beautiful June morning happens to be my first kayak of the season and the first day of my retirement! I’ll say it was a long time coming, I had been counting down for the last year and a half.  All that time the goal was to be able to go out kayaking anytime I like!  This freedom is so nice.   Not much has changed since my last visit here.  As I headed towards the boat launch on Route 5 I noticed the Connecticut River was very low and wondered if I’d make it to the Manhan.  I did get stuck trying to take a shortcut in the Oxbow on the way to the Manhan.  I tried crossing over the sandbar coming out from under the Route 91 bridge, I should have known to stay in the boat channel but no worries I had all day to push back off the bar back into the channel.  I did make it and managed to get up into the river about a quarter of a mile before being halted by the laydowns.

I did see a Robin, a few Great Blues, several Tree Swallows, six Mallards, many blackbirds, and a Kingfisher chasing an American Crow.  The sweet voice of a Song Sparrow high in a tree overhead held me up for quite a few minutes as did several chirping sparrows.

Once it started to rain it was time to head back.  Not so bad having to leave as I know I’ll be back another day.

— 2011 Post–

The Manhan River was a great find on our first trip on the Oxbow.  When we first started kayaking our group was Don S., Ray, Don C., Renee, Matt, and Megan.  We did a lot of kayaking together.  Our first trips to the Oxbow were really about the Oxbow.  The Croteau’s all like to fish, The Samson’s just enjoyed the beauty of the water and nature. I remember there were always a few fish caught but what I really remember is seeing Renee meandering out of the mouth of a river and then seeing her pull up onto the front of her kayak this great big fish. I think it was a Shortnose Sturgeon . This thing must have been 3 feet long!  Would have been a great catch but really the poor thing had either been caught on one too many hooks or was hit by a boat.  It was barely alive but it was a sight to see.  That day was the first time we entered the Manhan.

Don on the Manhan

Paddling down this river is so nice.  It’s got that closed in feel that gives you a personal oneness with the river.  There is always something to enjoy on this river.  Like so many rivers you paddle the Great Blue Herons are always around.  They let you get so close to them then they fly 100 feet upriver, get close again and they fly another 100 feet.  The same thing with the Kingfisher… Two birds that you’ll normally see alone flying ahead just out of reach of your camera.  I’ll get a picture of a Kingfisher someday I thought.

After that first time down this river I had to know more about it. It was then I went out and bought a great map. A DeLorme Atlas & Gazetteer of Massachusetts. This is the map every kayaker needs.  This map identified the Manhan River for me and so many ponds and rivers yet to come!

A Killdeer – a member of the Plover family

I’ve been back here many times and I’ve made the trip several times all by myself on early summer Saturday mornings.  I’m lucky that all the friends and relatives that I kayak with don’t mind that I stop to take pictures and sometimes wait quite a while to get the picture I’m trying for, but it great going it alone sometimes.  It’s nice to sit in one spot for an hour to wait for a deer or Kingfisher to come along with no one to hurry you…  then a surprise…  a Killdeer shows up to have it’s picture taken!

Most of the time from the Oxbow you can’t get to far up the Manhan River. There are river roadblocks or trees fallen into the river, “laydowns”.   At normal river levels you can get around most but sooner or later you get stopped.  On the Manhan you can rarely get up as far as the Fort Hill Road Bridge.  When the river is flooded, you’ll want to launch from the bridge and explore the woods in your kayak!  For the first few of my kayak years I longed to explore the woods when they were flooded.  Many times I could see great spots from the road but I could never find a good spot to launch.

Anyone home?

The Manhan and Mill rivers changed all that. When the Connecticut River is raging at flood stage the water in the Oxbow has nowhere to go. The same holds true with the rivers that empty into it.   Flood stage is really great.  This river stretches into both woods and fields.  In autumn floods you can be boating with bobbing pumpkins.  This spring Don and I came upon an abandoned camper half submerged.  One thing to be cautious of when kayaking a flooded river… your sense of direction can sometimes be confused.  More than once I thought I was going one way when in fact I was going the other.  I should bring a compass.

In short, this river is a gem to behold.

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