Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Seine Pond’

IPhone Pano of the put-in

iPhone Pano of the put-in

In August of 2015 Diane and I tried a new spot on the Cape called Ocean Mist for a few days. It was right on the Sound not but a few hundred feet from the mouth of Parkers River which looked very inviting on the map with several small ponds and a few open marshes to explore. However, when 6:00 AM arrived I found it a bit to breezy to put off from our beach. So as I had to find a Dunkin Donuts anyway, I headed to Route 28 to see if I could find another good put in. On the way I found a perfect spot right near the old ZooQuarium and Captain Parker’s Pub.   I knew this was going to be good when I walked over to the water line to look closer at the put in a Great Blue Heron took to flight squawking as I interrupted his morning peacefulness. Loading up my gear I realized I forgot my camera! What a tragedy! Oh well, not going back now, besides, I had my trusty iPhone so let’s see how it does.

As I was north of Route 28, getting to the mouth of the river and into Lewis Pond I would have had to go through the underpass. As the tide was high and going out, the constricted size of the tunnel caused the water move real fast, I thought there was no way I’d be able to paddle back up so I pushed on up river thinking I’d make it into Seine Pond and maybe into Long Pond further up.

A Perfect Morning

A Perfect Morning for Mourning Doves (iPic)

Pretty quickly I realized I was in for a treat. I was face to face with a Green Heron. He was sitting right in front of me on the boulders leading up to the underpass. Where was my camera? Moving on I see a man-made Osprey stand with a large nest. Then I saw more Green Herons, probably about four or five, more than I’ve ever seen together in one trip.   The Herons held my attention most of the way up the river. Then there was the sound of Ospreys. They were in the scrub pines watching over the calm of the river in the early morning. I saw three natural Osprey nests in the pines as I made my way to Seine Pond. Normally I haven’t seen many Osprey nests in trees as every year when the Osprey return to their nest they add on which increases the weight and they become too heavy for the trees and fall.  Going up river I thoroughly enjoyed watching the receding river expose the banks which were teaming with hermit crabs and mussels.  The sea grass was another sight to behold.  It seemed shorter than other mash areas I’ve observed. In one of the pine trees I spotted a couple of Mourning Doves.  A little out of placed I thought, but then it occurred to me I was the one probably out of place. This was their home most of the year, I was lucky to come by for a visit once or twice a season.

IMG_0701

Rounding the bend (iPic)

At the end of Parkers River as I rounded the bend into the pond there was a small windmill. All metal, it was probably put there to monitor coastal wind or water conditions. Seine Pond opening before me was larger than I had expected. All Pitch Pine on the right side, and several nice lake houses on the left. Further back I could several tall reed patches and I guessed that is where the feeder brook or river led up to Long Pond. I never found the entrance; it looked like the northern shore was nestled into a hillside not into other pond. No worries, a flock of swans caught my attention next. Congregated behind a bank of reeds I couldn’t count them, all I could see were long white necks. As they began filing out into the pond I followed and counted. Well over fifty, the largest flock I’ve ever seen in one place. Usually I’ll see one or two families, not fifty adults! I had been wondering why I’ve seen two names for this pond. My guess is the original name was Seine Pond and somewhere along the line Swan Pond came into being because of the large population residing here.

Paddling back I enjoyed a variety of gulls on their way to who knows where. There were Herring Gulls, Lesser and Greater Back Gulls and Bonaparte Gulls. I saw several Cormorants as well. Some were flying high overhead, while some raced across the pond two feet above the surface. I also witnessed a few takeoffs which is always a treat. One cormorant took off directly in front of my kayak, it was pretty cool watching him lift his wings up for that first burst that created the lift to rise him out of the water, from there it was a combination of wing and paddle power as he took off in the running takeoff fashion that is so typical of the Cormorant.

IMG_0733

Tree Swallows (iPic)

Back into the river the Tree Swallows became the next important inhabitants to observe. There were a couple of dead scrub oaks with flocks of swallows resting from the morning feeding I had witnessed on my paddle upriver. I heard several Catbirds crying in several spots along the river, and then I saw the Ospreys again. This time two of them were fending off an intruding band of crows. The crows seemed to reside in the woods further back and I was thinking that this must be a fairly common ritual as crows always seem to be the aggressor looking for a free meal.

As I rounded the last bend back to the launch I noticed how much fiercer the current had become under the Route 28 bridge, the tide had quite an effect. Had I chosen to go down river there would have been no to get back to the launch and judging from what I knew the steep banks looked like on the other side the only recourse would have been to paddle back down and out to the sound and around the beach in front of our hotel.

Well, getting out at the landing I was thankful, and the memories of vacations past when my parents took us to the Zooquarium in what was probably its final days.

Osprey in flight!

Osprey in flight!

I did go back the same spot the next morning this time with my camera and was I glad that I did. The second trip was dominated by Ospreys. Both on the way up and back they held my attention. Several times I would just sit beneath them and wait for them to fly off. It’s times like this that your rewarded with a great shot.

Diane and I did take an evening walk to the Red Jacket Inn to look at the mouth of the river. Lewis Pond was right across the river from our vantage point. I looked nice but not enough to entice me to it more than another trip to Parkers River again sometime. I hope the put in remains the same as thinking back on it the bank was really too high to get a kayak no matter what the level of the water. However, there was a perfect little shoot dug into the bank in which my single kayak glided into the water nicely. I’d like to thank that nice person that took the time  🙂

 

IMG_5977a

Update: August 2016.

I visited the Cape a few times this summer and on the second trip I once again visited the river and pond with goals of a) trying to find a safer put-in and b) enjoying the river and taking a few more pics!

Last year I paddled north along the east side of the lake and found nothing so this winter I looked at Google Maps along the west coast and found a few possible spots.  I still launched from the Route 28 spot because I knew it however it was a little tricky.  I think the reason I choose it was that I enjoyed the river much more than that pond.  I sat in my kayak with a coffee and breakfast sandwich watching a Green Heron settle into a comfortable position as he waited for his breakfast to swim by!  There was also a great backdrop for viewing in the Osprey nest and perch that held three adults and at least a few offspring.   I could have stayed there for a long time but I had business.

I paddled against the current as the tide was going out. Upriver I paddled by the small windmill. I had done a bit more research on it as well, it’s purpose was not as I thought  but instead it is being used to pump air into the pond to help it’s oxygen level.  Live and Learn!

Paddling up the west bank searching for the potential put-in I actually found two.  The first was a small beach that I was afraid might be private.  I got out to investigate and it turns out it’s an Association Beach.  I asked a gentleman watering his lawn in the house across the  street if it was OK to park and launch from here and he said it sure would be OK.  After thanking him I got back in and paddled a hundred more feet or so and found the road I had seen on Google.  Lake Road ends right in the pond!  Right where I want to be next time out!

IMG_8735

Read Full Post »